Black History Month- Vanessa-May's Story

Black History Month- Vanessa-May's Story

When I was younger, I was often described as “bright”, “enthusiastic” and a “ray of sunshine”.  It was never detected that I had autism as a young girl, as my doctor said I was ahead of my peers and couldn’t possibly be autistic. News flash, they were severely incorrect
Olivia Wilson

Black History Month | Olivia's Story

In school as an undiagnosed autistic child, I felt like a misfit. Like everyone
except me got a script on how to act. In spaces where I was the minority, I
thought it was just because of my race. But sometimes it felt like I didn’t fit into
my race or culture either. I felt alienated from people who shared that part of
my identity too. I now know it was because I am autistic, and what separated
me back then was that I was an undiagnosed black autistic girl. The diagnostic criteria was not made for me, a minority within minority. This contributes heavily to why I and so many other girls go undiagnosed.

Supporting Sensory-Friendly School Uniforms for Children with Autism and Sensitivities

Supporting Sensory-Friendly School Uniforms for Children with Autism and Sensitivities

Traditional school uniforms, while offering a sense of unity and identity, can be problematic for children with autism and sensitivities. These uniforms often come with features such as stiff collars, itchy fabrics, tight waistbands, and tags that can cause discomfort and distress. For children already navigating sensory sensitivities, these challenges can further hinder their ability to focus and learn effectively.
Understanding Neurodivergent Clothing: What Is It and Why Does It Matter

Understanding Neurodivergent Clothing: What Is It and Why Does It Matter

Neurodivergent clothing refers to clothing designed with the specific needs and preferences of neurodivergent individuals in mind. Neurodivergent is a term used to describe people whose neurological development and functioning differ from the typical or "neurotypical" population. This includes individuals with conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), sensory processing disorder (SPD), and others.
person sleeping on a sofa with weighted eye mask and weighted blanket

Finding Comfort and Calm

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) affects how individuals process sensory input, leading to potential sensory overload. Neurodivergent individuals, including those with autism, ADHD, or anxiety, may face significant sensory challenges. This piece delves into the benefits of weighted items, such as blankets and clothing, for those with SPD. These items exert deep pressure on the body, inducing calmness, enhancing proprioception, promoting sensory integration, and improving focus. They are a valuable tool for managing SPD, especially when complemented by sensory-friendly environments and self-regulating activities, helping individuals thrive despite sensory challenges.